For over twenty years Clive Francis has been involved with David Garrick’s Temple to Shakespeare in Hampton, and for the past ten years acting as Chairman for its Trustees.

Garrick built the Temple in the riverside grounds of his magnificent villa to celebrate the genius of William Shakespeare. The Temple is open to the public on Sunday afternoons (14.00-17.00) from late March to the end of October. Admission to the Garrick Exhibition and most events is free.

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Nathaniel Dance-Holland’s painting of David Garrick as Richard III. Courtesy of Stratford-upon-Avon Town Hall.
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Johan Zoffany R.A., The Shakespeare Temple at Hampton House, with Mr and Mrs David Garrick
Courtesy of the Garrick Club London.

2017 will be Garrick’s tercentenary and we will be celebrating it with a variety of concerts all of which have yet to be announced. We would also like to extend a hand of acknowledgment to the Lichfield Garrick Theatre, Garrick’s home town of Lichfield.

David Garrick (1717 – 1779) was not only one the greatest actors of his day, but also a leading playwright, entrepreneur, theatre manager, copious letter writer and someone who influenced nearly all aspects of theatrical practice throughout the 18th century. He took London by storm with his portrayal of Richard III at the age of 23, bringing with it a naturalism audiences had not witnessed before. He was billed as, ‘A Gentleman who had never set foot upon the stage.’ But anonymity did not remain with him long. Very soon after his debut, Garrick made the leap to the west end, to the Theatre Royal , Drury Lane, where he eventually purchased a share of the theatre with James Lacy. Garrick's management lasted 29 years, during which time it rose to prominence as one of the leading theatres in Europe. At his death, three years after his retirement from Drury Lane and the stage, he was given a lavish public funeral at Westminster Abbey where he was laid to rest in Poets' Corner.

www.garrickstemple.org.uk
www.lichfieldgarrick.com

For over twenty years Clive Francis has been involved with David Garrick’s Temple to Shakespeare in Hampton, and for the past ten years proudly acting as Chairman for its Trustees. Garrick built the Temple in the riverside grounds of his magnificent villa to celebrate the genius of William Shakespeare. The Temple is open to the public on Sunday afternoons (14.00-17.00) from late March to the end of October. Admission to the Garrick Exhibition and most events is free.

www.lichfieldgarrick.com/Theatre-celebrates-300th-anniversary-of-David-Garrick

2017 will be Garrick’s tercentenary and we will be celebrating it with a variety of concerts all of which have yet to be announced. We would also like to extend a hand of acknowledgment to the Lichfield Garrick Theatre, Garrick’s home town,


David Garrick (1717 – 1779) was not only one the greatest actors of his day, but also a leading playwright, entrepreneur, theatre manager, copious letter writer and someone who influenced nearly all aspects of theatrical practice throughout the 18th century. He took London by storm with his portrayal of Richard III at the age of 23, bringing with it a naturalism audiences had not witnessed before. He was billed as, ‘A Gentleman who had never set foot upon the stage.’ But anonymity did not remain with him long. Very soon after his debut, Garrick made the leap to the west end, to the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, where he eventually purchased a share of the theatre with James Lacy. Garrick's management lasted 29 years, during which time it rose to prominence as one of the leading theatres in Europe. At his death, three years after his retirement from Drury Lane and the stage, he was given a lavish public funeral at Westminster Abbey where he was laid to rest in Poets' Corner.

www.garrickstemple.org.uk

Alt image
Nathaniel Dance-Holland’s painting of David Garrick as Richard III. Courtesy of Stratford-upon-Avon Town Hall.
Alt image
Johan Zoffany R.A., The Shakespeare Temple at Hampton House, with Mr and Mrs David Garrick. Courtesy of the Garrick Club London.
Copyright © 2016 Clive Francis. All rights reserved. Main photograph of Clive Francis by Simon Annand.